For me, you definitely can’t miss the Roasters cafe, on the one hand it has an absolutely beautiful interior (such a hipster and insta friendly: D) and when you sit by the window you have a nice view of the street where you can watch the locals, on the other hand because they have excellent coffee. We also had a very good breakfast in Egill Jacobsen, so I would jump there again.

Andy wanted to take us to a super brunch in Kaffihus Vestbrbaejar, but they don’t have it until 11, so we had a classic breakfast – I had yogurt with granola and the girls sweet / salted croissants, but they have a much wider menu. And especially! Next door is the Braud bakery (there are more in Reykjavík) where they sell the best cinnamon snails in the world (not that I ate them all, actually this was my second in life, but he was great and everyone is absolutely thrilled).

LOOKING BACK TO ICELAND TIPS: WHERE TO EAT AND WHAT TO SEE ANDREA MOKREJŠOVÁ
Pin on Pinterest

This is the fifth day since Andy Pavelcová’s return from Iceland and a month since my visit to Iceland. At first I definitely didn’t want to make an article from Iceland, because Andy has such amazing articles on his blog and of course there is a difference when she was there for 5 months and I for 5 days.

But the photos are so beautiful that I want them on my blog, because travel just belongs to me.

That’s why you will find a lot of photos and a few tips in this article, which I don’t think you should miss. 🙂

And once again I would like to thank all the girls. Especially Andy, who invited us, accommodated us and made us the best guide around Iceland, but also Katharine and Katharine, that they were such a great company, because we basically laughed from morning to evening. (Yeah, we really were two Andy and two Katharine, you can’t think of that.: D)

So where do you drop by for food in Reykjavik?
For me, you definitely can’t miss the Roasters cafe, on the one hand it has an absolutely beautiful interior (such a hipster and insta friendly: D) and when you sit by the window you have a nice view of the street where you can watch the locals, on the other hand because they have excellent coffee. We also had a very good breakfast in Egill Jacobsen, so I would jump there again.

Andy wanted to take us to a super brunch in Kaffihus Vestbrbaejar, but they don’t have it until 11, so we had a classic breakfast – I had yogurt with granola and the girls sweet / salted croissants, but they have a much wider menu. And especially! Next door is the Braud bakery (there are more in Reykjavík) where they sell the best cinnamon snails in the world (not that I ate them all, actually this was my second in life, but he was great and everyone is absolutely thrilled).

From local businesses, I have one more tip for you. Andy worked here for those 5 months, it’s a vegan cafe – Kaffi Vinyl. You don’t have to worry at all, the food is great and it’s worth coming here, but it’s definitely worth going to live music in the evening, having a drink and just being there. The atmosphere is absolutely great.

And besides, be sure to buy their Skyr and of course some fish in the store. For more tips on how to shop and general practical tips for Iceland, see Andy in the article: Iceland: how to find a job, how to shop cheap, practical tips.

And what not to miss in general?
Definitely read more in the article by Andy: Iceland: the most interesting places and tips for a trip for a few days.

For me, it is my duty to take a bath in the hotpot – it is such a balm for the soul and the body.  You can read more about them at Andy: Iceland: 14 best mountain springs and how to get to them, this article is incredibly helpful, because the best hotpots are of course a bit hidden.

Be sure to visit the waterfalls, for example Skógafoss, Seljalandfoss, but of course there are more. Do not miss the beach Reynisfjara, cliffs Dyrhólaey. Stop at Kirkjufell, Svörtuloft Lighthouse, Skarðsvík Beach and the Arnastapi.

And one more tip for accommodation in a beautiful and cozy guest house in Ólavsfvík – Gistiheimilið Við Hafið.

The rest of the tips you will find more at Andy, this I would just give a very quick and brief overview.

How to get from the airport to Reykjavik?

If you’re not an adventurer or just don’t want to hitchhike, there are several options for you:

1. MHD. The cheapest is to take it by city bus. You can find it on the Strætó.is app, but it doesn’t run very often on weekends, so you’ll have to reach for private lines.

2. FLYBUS. Of the private routes, the cheapest is probably Flybus, which has a ticket shop directly at the airport and runs once an hour for about 500 Czech crowns. I know it’s enough, but welcome to Iceland.

3. AUTO. But if you rent a car, I would definitely rent it right at the airport. The best and cheapest company in Iceland – sadcars.com – has a branch there. We rented a car there for 2.5 days for 60 EUR. They are said to have abraded, dirty or old cars from time to time, but according to the latest reports, they have teamed up with another company that has provided them with better cars and Sadcars has provided its reputation as the cheapest car rental company.

The fun with the car from Sadcars is also that you get a car discount card for the gas station, where they will also give you free coffee. So in the end, our trip looked like we stopped every time we met the gas, one of us always ran out, got coffee, and drove on. We even played the game of seeing the gasoline first!

I would definitely recommend my own car in Iceland. You will be flexible on trips and you will be able to discover the true beauties of Iceland, where you will find it difficult to meet animals.

4. RIDE. If you prefer a car but do not dare to drive, try driving. You can find it on the Samferda website.

How to get accommodation in Iceland?

Luck will play a little here. For me, it was good to be in the right group on Facebook at the right time. I joined a group of students in Iceland who were to start a year with me. And just that morning, my current roommate wrote there that she discovered a great bejvák and who would go for it too.

1. LONG-TERM HOUSING. Our house, which has three floors, was discovered on housinganywhere.com. There are a lot of rooms or apartments and especially for long-term rent it is the best.

2. UNDER THE ROOF IN THE CITY. If you are looking for a shorter period of accommodation under a fixed roof, I would choose the cheapest Couchsurfing or Booking.

3. UNDER THE TENT. Many of you would definitely like to camp in the summer. And I definitely recommend! It’s the cheapest option, unless a hurricane is on fire. Sometimes I’ve heard that hikers set up tents on warm ground where local geysers are bubbling, but that strikes me as the biggest bullshit ever. You never know when it will explode under your head. I would definitely recommend the Campingcard page, where you will find a map of all campsites in Iceland. There you can set up a tent for a fee or rent a cottage.

4. CARRIAGE. There are many companies in Iceland where you can rent a large motorhome. Prices vary again. Take a look at Campers on Iceland, for example.

5. DO YOU GO FOR WORK? THEN HOLD! However, if you are looking for a job on a farm or in a hotel in Iceland, keep in mind that your employer will usually provide you with accommodation. Therefore, arrange work and accommodation first or choose a shorter rental and then move to a place that your employer will determine.

How to shop cheaply in Iceland?

No. It will never go cheap. But it can be cheaper. Reykjavik is one of the most expensive cities ever. When I first climbed into the nearest open supermarket, I stared like crazy. If I convert it to Czech, then six eggs for a hundred, a bottle of water for 250, – or a tray of cheese for 150, -.

Fortunately, there is…

Supermarket BÓNUS. Bonus is love. It is a store similar to Lidl, where you will find everything from food, to basic drugstore to beer. There are several of them after Reykjavík and the students do not go anywhere else.

It is true that eggs are very expensive, so are cheeses, I prefer not to buy meat at all, but you can buy them by cooking great delicacies. I prefer to buy fish, shrimp, vegetables, fruit and Skyr yogurts. It’s something between cottage cheese and Greek yogurt and it’s best to buy a flavorless white, because even that is so delicious that it doesn’t have to be sweeter.

What not to forget about Iceland?

Here is a list of things you should definitely not leave at home, as it could be expensive here.

Waterproof clothing and shoes. Iceland has totally unpredictable weather. My cell phone broke down the first week, because it just couldn’t last even in a waterproof jacket. Think of warm shoes that will not get wet and in which you will be able to march.

Thermal underwear and wool socks. The temperature sometimes seems cool even in winter, but when the wind leans against you, you will feel that it is from 10 degrees less. Don’t underestimate the bottom layer and dress sheep’s wool perfectly.

Good camera and tripod. Iceland is worth beautiful photos. Often you will not capture what is really here on your mobile. And especially the aurora borealis! Without a tripod, you will definitely not be able to take pictures of it.

A bottle at the airport. If you like to drink something sharper, I would recommend you to buy a bottle at Duty Free at the airport, because it will not be cheaper in Iceland.

Driving license. You never know when it will come in handy in Iceland. Traveling by car is definitely the most comfortable option.

Map or guide. Don’t underestimate the preparation. When you stand on a deserted plain and freeze your hands on the map to see if you have gone astray, you will be very sorry. Before each trip, take a look at the weather, the availability of the route (Road.is application) that you have planned and let someone know where you are going. If you don’t have friends, you can use the Safetravel application, for example.

How to get a job in Iceland?

I found a job a few days after arriving in Iceland. Just so you know, Icelanders aren’t exactly people who would sit down at e-mails and respond to everyone. Therefore, do not be discouraged when jobs will respond to your job demands very dryly (in one word) or not at all.

Icelanders make personal contact or telephone calls. That’s why I started looking for a job after arriving on my own. I went to cafes and asked if they were looking for someone. I always sat in the cafe for a while, ordered something, watched the surroundings and the people behind the bar for a while, if I liked it, and only then I went to ask.

I immediately fell in love with the Vínyl café, where you can play plates all day, and where vegan specialties are cooked, which even an avid meat fan would not refuse! I immediately liked the team and the next day I went for a friendly interview. I only brought a resume and after a 15-minute chat I was accepted.

What currency they use in Iceland

In Iceland, you pay in Icelandic króna (ISK).

But you can also pay in Euros. However, Icelandic crowns will be returned to you. I had no problem with the payment card anywhere yet, they took it everywhere in the city. Iceland is progressive. Only in some areas in nature can you pay only in cash.

How do you communicate in Iceland?

Icelandic is spoken in Iceland. It’s a relatively difficult language that I’ve been learning for weeks and it’s definitely not a toy. But it still occurs to me that Czech grammar is more difficult. If you know at least a little German or English, it will be easier for you, because these languages have many words in common or at least you will derive them.

On the other hand, it’s great that all Icelanders speak excellent English. Many foreigners work in the services here, so it is quite common for people behind the bar to speak English together as well.

That’s why it was relatively easy to find a job here, because you can hear English in Reykjavík more often than Icelandic.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.